Rubric for writing a scene in a play

Here's some advice to help you get through preparing for your first day and how to get through your first few weeks.

Rubric for writing a scene in a play

Variety of ideas and contexts Ideas represent a startling variety of important concepts from different contexts or disciplines. Ideas represent important concepts from different contexts or disciplines.

Ideas represent important concepts from the same or similar contexts or disciplines. Ideas do not represent important concepts. Variety of sources Created product draws on a wide variety of sources, including different texts, media, resource persons, or personal experiences.

Created product draws on a variety of sources, including different texts, media, resource persons, or personal experiences. Created product draws on a limited set of sources and media.

Created product draws on only one source or on sources that are not trustworthy or appropriate. Combining ideas Ideas are combined in original and surprising ways to solve a problem, address an issue, or make something new.

Ideas are combined in original ways to solve a problem, address an issue, or make something new. Ideas are combined in ways that are derived from the thinking of others for example, of the authors in sources consulted.

Ideas are copied or restated from the sources consulted. Communicating something new Created product is interesting, new, or helpful, making an original contribution that includes identifying a previously unknown problem, issue, or purpose.

Created product is interesting, new, or helpful, making an original contribution for its intended purpose for example, solving a problem or addressing an issue.

Created product serves its intended purpose for example, solving a problem or addressing an issue. Created product does not serve its intended purpose for example, solving a problem or addressing an issue. Brookhart, Alexandria, VA: Copyright by ASCD. I created this rubric with some trepidation—because where there's a rubric, there will be someone who's thinking of using it to grade.

Generating a grade is not the intended purpose of the rubric for creativity. Rubrics help clarify criteria for success and show what the continuum of performance looks like, from low to high, from imitative to very creative. For that reason, rubrics are useful for sharing with students what they're aiming for, where they are now, and what they should do next.

I do not recommend grading creativity. Another advantage of the rubric for creativity is that it functions as a visual organizer that makes us consider creativity apart from the other criteria for the work. For example, in the acrostic poem assignment, other criteria might include the quality of the ideas conveyed, word choice and use, and correct application of the acrostic format.

There's more opportunity for creativity in some criteria ideas than in others using the acrostic format properlyso creativity is not entirely separate from the quality of the work.

Still, taking a step back from the work and focusing on its creativity allows for the kind of feedback missing in those opening classroom examples. Giving Feedback on Creativity As you might expect with such a broad concept as creativity, there's no single formula that will always work.

Start by helping students understand what creativity is, using rubrics, examples, and discussion about these.

Stimulating Creative Thinking

Then give feedback on the level of creativity you observe in their work. In the example of the acrostic poem, the teacher might have coached the girl to work with more originality, explaining that her work was very much like many other poems and challenging her to write a poem that was less like those of others.

The boy needed to know that his use of unique personality terms—such as aggressive and nutty—was creative and poetically skilled. In these cases, a few words of feedback to each student would probably have sufficed.

rubric for writing a scene in a play

The important thing is to say the words—to name, note, encourage, and value the creativity in the work. Teachers can give more complex feedback on more complex assignments. For example, in the write-a-melody music assignment, some melodies will sound very much like themes that other composers have written.lesson plan is primarily effective in a classroom setting.

Assessment strategvies and rubrics are included. The lessons were developed by Lisa Van Gemert, monstermanfilm.comT., the Mensa Foundation’s Gifted Children Specialist. Lesson Plan: Writing a screenplay Introduction Strong readers make the “movie” of a book in their minds.

Play is typed, double spaced, and in an acceptable font. Contains a couple grammatical mistakes and /or is missing one required piece of data (name or date) from the coverpage.

Coverpage has title of play. Writing Mini-Lessons: Student Fictional Narrative Samples. These fictional narrative samples were written by Nancie Atwell’s middle school students. These pieces are strong examples of fictional narratives that provide a level of quality for which fifth and sixth grade students may strive.

Student devotes a lot of time and effort to the writing process (prewriting, drafting, reviewing, and editing). Works hard to make the story wonderful.

Student devotes sufficient time and effort to the writing process (prewriting, drafting, .

rubric for writing a scene in a play

5 Before beginning the Writing test, all students are given a coloured Writing test stimulus sheet and are read the following instructions: Today you will do a Writing test.

Edit Article How to Write a Good Story. In this Article: Article Summary Getting Inspired Improving Your Story Writing Skills Developing Your Story Revising Your Story Sample Excerpts Community Q&A Humans are and can be storytellers.

But when it comes to writing a good story, you may feel stumped, even if you have a vivid imagination and a million great ideas.

Arthur Miller's The Crucible: Fact & Fiction, by Margo Burns